Covid-19 in Children with Emphasis on Prevention: A Rapid Review

Authors

1 Anesthesiologist, Department of Anesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Shirvan, Iran.

2 Pediatric Neurologist, Department of Pediatric, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

3 Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatric, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

4 Anesthesiologist, Department of Anesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

5 Assistant Professor of Pediatric Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Abstract

Children of all ages can be infected with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), and experience complications. Children with COVID-19 might present with many symptoms, a few symptoms, or be asymptomatic. The most common symptoms in children are fever and dry cough, and other common symptoms include nasal congestion or a runny nose, fatigue, and headache. Evidence suggests that many children develop long-term COVID-19. As of September 22, 2020, no vaccine trials were conducted on children under 18 years. According to the CDC, adolescents aged 16 or 17 are eligible for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, but not Moderna or Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines. As of March 2021, Moderna and Pfizer/Biotech had begun vaccine trials on children, and Johnson & Johnson planned to do the same. Children and adolescents are generally at a lower risk of infection, and if an infection occurs, it is likely to be mild. However, some children and young people have had severe experiences with the disease, and a few have died. COVID-19-related measures have a profound effect on health and well-being, and for some, the impact will be lifelong.

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